London celebrations

Brighton postcode named England’s ‘coolest’ which overtakes London’s Shoreditch, Camden and Brixton

When you think of the ‘coolest’ places in England, the capital naturally comes to mind.

London is brimming with character and fascinating places, but it’s here in Brighton that you’ll find the country’s most vibrant new neighborhood.

That’s because a central Brighton postcode has been named one of the ‘coolest’ places to move to in 2022 thanks to its quirky, artsy vibe as millennials ‘flee London in droves’.

Read more: Brighton, Eastbourne and Horsham named among the best places in the UK to start a business

BN1 came tenth in a list of the best places to live in the UK, according to The Sunday Times.



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It comes as neighborhoods across the country reap the benefits of people moving away from the capital.

NG1, Hockley to Nottingham tops the chart, while the postcodes of Northumberland, Swansea, Manchester and Somerset complete the top five.

Brighton’s BN1 rounds out the top 10 ‘hip new neighborhoods you need to know’ and is described as a place ‘for those who love a homecoming queen’.

Not a single London location made the list, as “sure things” like Brixton, Camden and Shoreditch were notably absent.



Brighton Open Market on London Road is a bustling hub of activity and creativity
Brighton Open Market on London Road is a bustling hub of activity and creativity

MyLondon even recently reported a record 112,000 Londoners buying properties outside the city in 2021.

And Brighton has proven to be one of the most popular postcodes for people moving.

The Sunday Times said Brighton was ‘hardly unknown’ but the city was ‘slightly set back’ before adding that everything had now changed.

He credited a young, artistic crowd for this revival – as did the people who live and work there.

“I wish I had moved from London to Brighton a long time ago”



Beverley Glasford, 66, said she loved Brighton and its relaxed atmosphere
Beverley Glasford, 66, said she loved Brighton and its relaxed atmosphere

At the Brighton Open Market, 66-year-old marketer Beverley Glasford said she loved Brighton because of its diversity and how safe and comfortable she felt there.

“You get all sorts here, nothing can surprise me in Brighton,” she said.

“I think it’s very relaxed, people can relax more here.

“And in terms of fashion, you can wear whatever you want and no one will say anything.”



Beverley Glasford says BN1 is
Beverley Glasford says BN1 is “very relaxed”

Beverley, who lives near the market, moved from London to Brighton around 15 years ago and said: “I love Brighton.

“London has lost its spark a bit.

“I wish I had made the move a long time ago, let’s put it that way.”

‘BN1 has everything you could want’



Emily Croucher says BN1 has a
Emily Croucher says BN1 has a “great vibe”

Emily Croucher, 34, who works on a job project supporting charity Grace Eyre and also based in Brighton Open Market, said she has seen the area change over the past few years to become a “nice and lively neighborhood in which to hang out”.

“I think it’s because [Brighton] is quite small, you can still walk everywhere, which I like,” she said.

“BN1 is just the main area of ​​the city, from this end of London Road to the Lanes, but you also have the sea in there.

“It has everything you could want.”



The lanes at the heart of BN1 showcase the independent and artistic thinking that has helped Brighton become one of the most
The lanes in the heart of BN1 showcase the independent and artistic thinking that has helped Brighton become one of the ‘coolest’ areas

She went on to praise the abundance of cafes, bars and restaurants in the area, as well as independent shops and local parks like the Level.

“It really feels like you have something for everyone.”

She added: “It’s quite arty and there’s the university creating a vibe because you have students coming every year.

“There’s a vegan and zero waste influence and I think it’s pretty ethical.



BN1 runs from the Upside Down house via i360 on the seafront to the South Downs
BN1 runs from the Upside Down house via i360 on the seafront to the South Downs

“I’m not vegan but I love that there are all these different options.”

She concluded: “I really love Brighton and can understand why people move here.

“Love being here and just the buzz of the place.”

BN1 Highlights and Attractions



The Upside Down House on Brighton seafront is a unique attraction
The Upside Down House on Brighton seafront is a unique attraction

The BN1 postcode spans the Brighton seafront from the Palace Pier to just past i360.

It then stretches across the city encompassing the Lanes, Churchill Square Shopping Centre, the Brighton Dome and the Royal Pavilion.

As well as countless top-notch pubs, bars and restaurants, it then extends to the South Downs at Devil’s Dyke and Stanmer.

Brighton Seafront



A view from the i360 looks east over Brighton seafront towards Kemptown
A view from the i360 looks east over Brighton seafront towards Kemptown

About a mile from Brighton’s central seafront is covered by the BN1 postcode.

This stretches from Old Steine ​​where BN1 meets Kemptown and the Brighton Palace Pier to a short way past BA i360 and the burnt out skeleton of West Pier.

The observation tower itself propels visitors more than 160 meters into the air for a bird’s eye view of the city skyline and a breathtaking view of the sea where they can spot the Rampion wind farm on the horizon.

The waterfront stretch also features the family-favorite Upside Down illusion house and notable culinary highlights such as the award-winning burger restaurant lucky beach.

Alleys



Kensington Gardens is in the heart of North Laine
Kensington Gardens is in the heart of North Laine

Brighton is home to a number of maze-like streets known as the Lanes, which stretch from Black Lion and Duke Street to the North Laine area.

Every twist you make here will greet you with a new cafe, restaurant or independent shop – each more diverse and appealing than the last.

Gardner Street is an artsy neighborhood home to Komedia and GAK, whose street decorations and visuals resemble Camden, but with a Brighton twist.

Purchases



BN1 has a very CamdenTown feel to some areas
BN1 has a very CamdenTown feel to some areas

The Lanes offer an alternative shopping experience where quirky and uniquely Brighton food can be bought or simply seen in a host of independent shops and market stalls.

But for those looking for great street names, a short walk to the Churchill Square shopping center or along Queens Road will surely fill any purchases.

Eat and drink



The Prince Albert pub in Trafalgar Street is also a landmark on a Brighton street art tour
The Prince Albert pub in Trafalgar Street is also a landmark on a Brighton street art tour

Brighton is home to hundreds of top-notch bars, cafes and restaurants, so much so that it can be hard to decide where to go.

The city has a strong vegan, ethical, and zero-waste ethos that can best be seen through the restaurants it offers.

The Sunday Times sheds light on the Douglas McMaster silo, but noted drama when the chef didn’t feel like Brighton had ‘got’ his restaurant in 2017.



The colorful Prince Albert pub in Brighton with an amazing graffiti wall
The colorful Prince Albert pub in Brighton with an amazing graffiti wall

The newspaper also highlighted Due South, Burnt Orange Bar and the soon to be opened new Soho House on the edge of BN1 in Kemptown.

Of course, residents and visitors can choose from a host of other names, including Purezza for vegans, while Baqueano Steakhouse is TripAdvisor’s top-rated restaurant for meat eaters.

Brighton Royal Pavilion and Dome



Brighton's Royal Pavilion is typical of Regency architecture and hosts an annual Christmas ice rink
Brighton’s Royal Pavilion is typical of Regency architecture and hosts an annual Christmas ice rink

Brighton is a city steeped in history and was once a favorite of the royal family and the down house of 19th century Londoners.

This is a fact that can still be seen today through the abundance of Regency architecture throughout the city, as well as landmarks such as Brighton Dome and the Royal Pavilion.

Both have taken on various roles over the years but are now open to the public – Brighton Dome as an event space and The Pavilion as a museum you can visit.

Parks, green spaces and the South Downs



Devil's Dyke offers walks through the South Downs and views across Sussex
Devil’s Dyke offers walks through the South Downs and views across Sussex

Green spaces create veins across the BN1 postcode from Old Steine ​​in Victoria and Valley Gardens which recently hosted the Brighton Christmas Festival and up to The Level.

Preston Park and The Rockery also punctuate London Road as it joins the A27 in the South Downs to join sections of Postcode and Devil’s Dyke, The Amex and Stanmer Park.

Stretching a vast distance from Eastbourne to Hampshire, the rolling beauty of the South Downs National Park is the natural crown of Sussex and a jewel of the South East.

And the newly elected coolest postcode includes the legendary Devil’s Dyke viewpoint where you’ll have sweeping views of the Sussex countryside.

BN1 pretty cool, okay.

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