London celebrations

New Western Conference Series Aims to Make Domestic Violence ‘Everyone’s Business’

Thirty-two years after the mass shooting at École Polytechnique de Montreal that killed 14 women and injured 10 others, Western University has launched a new series of conferences aimed at mobilizing the community to help end the domestic violence against women and children.

Content of the article

Thirty-two years after the mass shooting at École Polytechnique de Montreal that killed 14 women and injured 10 others, Western University has launched a new series of conferences aimed at mobilizing the community to help end the domestic violence against women and children.

Advertising

Content of the article

The annual Peter Jaffe lecture series, which kicked off this week on the anniversary of the Montreal Massacre, will bring anti-violence researchers from around the world to Western to share their latest findings with the community.

“I think there is broad agreement in 2021 that domestic violence is everyone’s business,” said Peter Jaffe, professor emeritus at Western Faculty of Education and senior consultant to the London Family Court Clinic.

Jaffe co-founded Western’s Center for Research and Education on Violence Against Women and Children following the mass shooting in Montreal.

“We want to get people to actively participate in awareness and prevention and hopefully early intervention,” he said, stressing that everyone plays a vital role.

Advertising

Content of the article

Jaffe’s first conference, a virtual session that attracted approximately 3,300 people from half a dozen countries, focused on protecting children from domestic violence.

Peter Jaffe, who co-founded Western University's Center for Research and Education on Violence Against Women and Children, said COVID-19 is one of the reasons violence in the regard for women has worsened because the pandemic has created more isolation for abused women.  (Free photo of the press kit)
Peter Jaffe, who co-founded Western University’s Center for Research and Education on Violence Against Women and Children, said COVID-19 is one of the reasons violence in the regard for women has worsened because the pandemic has created more isolation for abused women. (Free photo of the press kit)

Engaging the public involves both educating people about healthy relationships, as well as the risk factors and warning signs of domestic violence, said Katreena Scott, director of the Western Research Center.

“It is often the people closest to the victims who have a lot of information they are concerned about, but they are just not sure. They don’t necessarily know this is a very dangerous situation, ”Scott said. “So it’s really important that we have this conversation. “

A 25-year-old man who blamed feminists for ruining his life distinguished women from men when he was shot in the Montreal engineering school on December 6, 1989, before killing himself. One of the worst mass murders in modern Canadian history, it shone the spotlight on violence against women and led Canada to toughen gun control laws.

Advertising

Content of the article

According to recent Statistics Canada data, 44 percent of Canadian women aged 15 and over reported having experienced some form of emotional, physical or sexual violence from an intimate partner in their lifetime.

In Ontario in the past year, 58 women and girls have died at the hands of men because they were women, the Ontario Association of Interval and Transition Houses, a core group, said in its annual list of feminicides. in the province. In recent years, the group has reported an increasing number of feminicides in women 55 and older.

One of the reasons violence against women has worsened, Jaffe said, is the COVID-19 pandemic, which has created more isolation for victims and children victims of violence.

Advertising

Content of the article

“Domestic violence is a matter of life and death,” he said. “I mean, one death is one too many. So the figures certainly show it, but it is also the human lives and the suffering behind these figures that concern me on a daily basis.

Domestic violence refers to any violence in an intimate relationship, including against children and the elderly, and those in same-sex or transgender relationships, Jaffe said.

December 6, the anniversary of the mass shooting in Montreal, is the National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women, with many events being held across Canada.

Since that terrible day in 1989, there have been many improvements in Canada in various areas when it comes to understanding, addressing and preventing violence against women and children, Jaffe said. He cited a recent change to divorce law, which now has a broad definition of family violence, including emotional, psychological and economic abuse, and coercive control.

The lecture series, he said, is “one of the 1,000 points of light, hopefully, to raise awareness and encourage people to take action and provide support to victims and children.”

“It’s also an important part of social change and making sure that this violence is no longer tolerated, or something that can continue behind closed doors and in families. “

[email protected]

Advertising

Advertising

comments

Postmedia is committed to maintaining a vibrant but civil discussion forum and encourages all readers to share their views on our articles. Comments may take up to an hour of moderation before appearing on the site. We ask that you keep your comments relevant and respectful. We have enabled email notifications. You will now receive an email if you receive a reply to your comment, if there is an update to a comment thread that you follow, or if a user that you follow comments. Visit our Community rules for more information and details on how to adjust your E-mail The settings.